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A VERY Comprehensive Review for WildStar from a 1%er [WARNING! This is Long!]

Discussion in 'WildStar General' started by Crucifer, May 9, 2013.

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  1. Bnol

    Bnol Cupcake-About-Town

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    My experience was a bit different than that, not sure what the population was at the time, but it is medium now. My first raiding guild started raiding in a guild alliance and some PuGs, we then recruited more and absorbed the raiders in our alliance and ran under one banner. We slowly cleared all of the content until Twin Emps in AQ40 and did the easy Naxx bosses until the pre-expansion lull hit. We certainly weren’t the best, but you didn’t need the best players to do 40-mans until late Vanilla. We were right in the middle in terms of our server progression on Alliance side, with 2 guilds better than us, 1-2 guilds on par and 2-3 guilds lower.
  2. Kayelia

    Kayelia Cupcake

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    Speaking as a soloer, this kind of stuff is what I'm concerned about. I don't mind if raiders get content. I don't mind if they're rewarded for the time/effort spent. But I do mind if those same raiders cause problems with the content I either enjoy or am trying to get sellables from.

    I've been on the receiving end of those "scourings." Not from raiders persay, but from the top pvp guild of another mmo. A useful item was added to pre-existing world boss drops. The guild quickly noticed and used it's better gears to spawncamp that boss and others. They had an immutable gear advantage over me. The situation went from fun boss to nightmare in a fortnight.

    I'm pretty wary of giving raiders an immutable gear advantage because of that.
  3. printerpaper

    printerpaper Cupcake

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    Good post. I particularly agree with the point of keeping PvP and PvE together. BGs and Arenas took the focus away from World PvP once introduced into WoW. The need to grind PvP gear or PvE gear only helped to frustrate and split the community.

    By focusing on World PvP in Wildstar, PvE becomes the only gear you need. If the devs want to provide rewards for PvP, they should be limited to PvP trophy skins. If you want to show off your PvP prowess, you can purchase PvP skins, to be applied to your PvE gear. This way, those who need to show off their PvP exploits can, without forcing an entirely different set of gear.
  4. Sephel

    Sephel Not a Cupcake

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    One of the big things that ruined it for me in WoW when they added cross realm capabilities after Vanilla. Sure it helped people get in groups faster, but it just destroyed the sense of close server community. I *loved* things like knowing everyone on the server and forming rivals in battlegrounds. I really miss that.
  5. Shodanas

    Shodanas New Cupcake

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    "DO NOT CATER TO CASUALS".. Really? Let me burst your bubble mate. The majority of today's MMO players are the "casuals" you so scornfully refer to. They are the people who keep the games going with their money and not the, so called, "hardcore", epix (pun intended) gear junkies like yourself. Do you think that WoW would reach such astronomical sub figures if Blizzard catered to the "pro" raiders and pvp'ers? Not in a million years. You're just a vocal minority and have no right to ask a developer to tailor a game strictly to your needs.
  6. Elthic

    Elthic Cupcake-About-Town

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    Such hate for the hardcore players lol.

    Developers need to cater to both the hardcore and casuals. That being said catering to just casuals will cause your player base to complete content extremely quickly, and then start complaining on the forums that there is nothing to do.

    There needs to be content for both hardcore and casuals.

    For example in this game the raiding the will be catered towards a more hardcore base, while there will be solo content available for casuals to do at end game. Such as solo dungeons, housing, crafting, paths, and I am sure there is more.
  7. Crucifer

    Crucifer Cupcake-About-Town

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  8. Xhatch

    Xhatch New Cupcake

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    Long post!

    From the perspective of the 1%, the points the OP makes are very valid. However, I believe those days & types of "Hardcore" MMO's are long over, or at the very least, W* is not aiming to cater just to this 1%.

    And that's just it. If an MMO wants to have mass appeal, then it needs to offer mass amounts of things to do to attract all these players who like different things. From what I have read & seen about W* thus far, they do seem to be aware of this & are trying to tailor the game to have a multitude of different things for players to do within the game. The 1% will be getting their 40 man hardcore raids.

    To want the entire game to be based around what the 1% likes isn't going to happen. Any game that does this will only have a smaller player base that is reflective of the tiny percentage of people who fall into the description of the 1%.

    Again, since W* is aiming to cater to all the different types of play styles that MMO's tend to have, it will most likely have mass appeal. Having said that, if you do try to cater to everyone then you may find it difficult to cater to them all equally or maybe certain aspects aren't going to be up to par compared to others. This is a balancing act for the developers & I'm sure they already know about this potential problem. As time goes on, the majority of the player base ends up gravitating towards one or two different end game activities, then the devs have to ask themselves is it worth putting in the time to make "X" for a small amount of the playerbase when we could make more of "Y" which the majority of the playerbase will use? - This is exactly how WoW has evolved into what it is today. For W*, it's fine on paper to say they will provide for the 1%, which they will do at the start of the game. But when the game is sometime into it's life cycle & the devs see how long it takes to keep making these 40 man raids, that only a tiny 1% of the play base sees, then they will face this exact same issue WoW did.

    WoW stopped making 40 man raids for several reasons, which I'm not going to go into here. The point is, they did stop making them. The question is, if a company like Blizzard, with a game as successful as WoW, decided to turn away from 40 man raids & abandon the very hardcore approach to its endgame content, why do the developers of W* think they can make it work? I honestly don't think it's because they are "better" than Blizzard. Personally I think they (W* devs) will find out the hard way on this raid issue in time.
  9. Sebastien Verret

    Sebastien Verret New Cupcake

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    Really great post.

    I especially like the part about keeping a living world. For me the difference between WoW Vanilla and Cata is staggering and sad. I remember my first time around the Deadmines, I was impressed by how many players were there and the interactions happening. You had to TALK to people to get in dungeons on the spot ! I remember the huge amount of people questing with me at the beginning of the dwarf area then going to KazModan watching some weird dudes on goats with their shiny armor.

    You couldn't just sit in a city to queue for dungeons or fly above everyone so the world felt alive !

    But you have to be careful and not make cooperation banal like GW2 where you just cooperate without effort or need to so you don't really talk and the world feels dead even with many people...
  10. Diableblanc

    Diableblanc Cupcake

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    why try hard to be the best if anyone can be the best?

    Wow, such an elitist comment it even made me feel a bit repulsed for a bit, it may not be what you meant but...really change that phrasing or keep it I don't know, your issue... Also Limbo is a good game, dunno why you'd go "Hardcore" on it it's obviously just not made for you, and League of legends is a bad game for you because it's a game specifically for casuals, seeing how INCREDIBLY REDONKULOUS is, (30 million players) I'd say that you're also wrong on it being it an awful game, and that's like, not even just an opinion anymore, a fact...If it's not your cup of tea don't have it, it's quality is as it is nevertheless and no need for you to bash any of the games. Though I agree other subjects, mmo today do feel bland....
  11. Etna_The_Undying

    Etna_The_Undying New Cupcake

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    You do know that wow reached 12M during TBC? When they did content for raiders? And that it went back up again in Cata during the release, when they promise TBC v.2 and that subs went down again when they nerfed everything?
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  12. Monarc

    Monarc Cupcake

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    As an ex "hardcore" now "casual" gamer I have to agree with NOT catering to casuals.

    I may not have time to play as much as I used to, but I still strive to achieve the difficult content as time allows, and wouldn't accept anything less.
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  13. Sephel

    Sephel Not a Cupcake

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    This. I don't have nearly as much time as I did when I was 16 years old spending 5 hours a night raiding Blackwing Lair. But damn, seeing the people who *do* have that kind of gear fully decked out, it gives me something to look forward to... one day. Something that isn't handed to you over time (*cough WoW arena gear cough*). As a casual gamer, I dislike catering to casual gamers.
  14. Dagron

    Dagron Cupcake

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    These two statements contradict eachother, most players are casual, and people who are happy with their gaming experience generally arnt on boards- they're playing the game.
    More like no more than 1 server at launch, arbitrarily dividing your playerbase is foolish.

    Clarification- swtor made the right decision there, 100%. they owned up to their mistake and undertook the very difficult process of merging servers in order to save their game, and they succeeded. Doing it right in the first place is important though- one server.

    Nonsense, sharding is the best thing ever. complain about the tuning of when and how zones split and how you move between them all you like, but having those 75 people next door is infinitely better than having them on another server altogether.

    Yes, it is a wasteland, pay attention to the storyline, everyone is all depressed because both sides strategy for winning the war is to bog eachother down by holding untakeable fronts, sapping morale and forcing supply routes to be vulnerable to ambush. If its not big enough, then it doesnt have enough people, if it forces players to go out and prance around a field killing boars, then its a grind fest. Figure out what you even want. They created an experience, people consume that experience and move on.

    know what I see when Im walking somewhere? a big fat loading screen. an unnescessary timesink. a reason to just park my main and log onto an alt instead of going back to town because I know Im just going to walk back out there again tomorrow. Even flying there detracts from the gaming experience. Raid doors are where its at.

    Hear, hear.
  15. Elrodeus

    Elrodeus Cupcake

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    Yes. Yes I do. because I remember doing it alot...back when I first played WoW during Vanilla. I remember marveling at at a Tauren with the Ashakandi Greatsword of the Brotherhood. I remember freaking out when I seen a paladin with the Corrupted Ashbringer. Both times I screenshotted said characters and freaked out and sent pics to my friends and also remember talking about them. I remember my friends asking me for their names so they can try to find them in the game world to see the weapons for themselves.

    So yes I really do think people do that. Because me and all my current friends had done it back in the day. We don't anymore because there's nothing to marvel at.
  16. Rumze

    Rumze "That" Cupcake

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    Its also easier to see gear on your character.
    You can link gear and then preview it on your toon these days.
    In the old days , you couldn't so half the folks following you around would have been trying to see how the model looked. You don't have to do that now.
  17. Elrodeus

    Elrodeus Cupcake

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    True...but I'm pretty sure someone who actually HAS the weapon would have to first link it. And there was hardly anyone that had those things. I only really seen the Corrupted Ashbringer once in game, the Ashkandi I think I seen on two or three characters. Considering I was on a high pop server with 45 minute queues....that's a very small percentage of the playerbase. They just don't make things as hard to attain or as rare as they used to.
  18. Gomer

    Gomer Cupcake

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    He isn't saying ' make content that casuals can't play' he is saying that if you make content specifically for casuals then you inevitably lose the real focus of the game. If you are having content handed to you without any real 'work' going into its possession then you breed players that aren't very good, gameplay wise. By all means, go ahead and make content that us mere mortals can play but if you make it so you don't even have to be good enough to get that raid gear, or PVP gear then there is no point. You can just romp and stomp and still be as <REDACTED> as you were when you started.
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  19. Shonk

    Shonk New Cupcake

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    I agree with much of what you're saying, but not all. I'll touch on a little bit of it.

    - The starting servers are based off of presale numbers. You know what is worse than have too many servers at launch? Wating in a queue for 45 minutes so you can play on an over populated server where there are so many people that the lag prevents you from doing anything but stand inside of 500 other people who are experiencing the same problems.

    - Instanced zones, if done right, will not suck the life out of a game. The main issue is that level capping a zone is the real problem and once you reach a certain level you have no reason to come back. So if you wait for a year to start playing the game it won't matter how many people can fit in a shard/instance if nobody else is starting any new characters. The beauty of a good system is that it can seamlessly merge/split instances based on the load of players up to a certain point. SWTOR is a bad example because replayablity was terrible.

    - No teleporting? That's a little extreme espeically since the world is supposed to super vast. The worst part about playing EVE (for me) is travelling anywhere.. Jump after jump for 20 minutes to mine on a rock that takes about half that time, and then back to where you started. I agree to keep it slower, but cohesion with large groups of people is much easier when you get all get to the same spot faster.

    - Vanilla WoW was fun.. Getting 40 people together, even on the best of days was not. The fights were epic because of the amount of people, the rewards were crappy because of the competition. In a way I feel more epic by doing a 10-man with my good friends and long time gaming buddies where everyone is held accountable for their mistakes, and can be congratulated for their successes.

    You have some good points, but games cost money to make, servers cost money to run, content costs money to expand on so money seems to be an important factor.
  20. raxurus

    raxurus New Cupcake

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    I agreed with all of your said points except for your views on gear with a -/+ system

    Much like in TERA a game with a perfected combat system, amazing combat flow, skill glyphs and combo system, dodging. evading and blocking and sheer lining up the positioning of your toon. This was all ruined by the fact that gear ruined the skill aspect of the game. TERA literally ruined itself, what would be the point of wildstar's intuitive combat mechanics which are meant to reward quick thinking, precision, skill to just get one shotted by someone who has gotten lucky enough with enchanting gear to +12 and doing repetitive dailies.

    In tera i played a slayer to level 60, the ganking up until 60 was awesome as i was fighting people with similar gear sets to me, hit 60 and you get one shotted by people in the BG's whom you remember there name from the gear equalised BG and you had actually beat them.

    Adding such an item system does not reward player skill it rewards the amount of effort and time put into a game in turn the game becomes a job. Games are designed to be entertaining for fun. Look at the most popular games of all time. Counter strike, league of legends, dota, elder scrolls (yes single player but challenging games not because you played for ages to get gear to kill a certain monster but because the monsters became challenging and you as a player had to become better, NOT YOUR GEAR)

    Once you turn a game into a mindless chore to get better gear just so you can start beating other players easier or at least not getting one shotted, you must ask yourself as a player ..." did i personally become better at this game? , am i more skilled? am i involving quick thinking and that adrenalin rush as you beat another player due to sheer wit OR was it your gear doing al the talking?"

    once the gear does the talking in a game you have essentially created a 3D emersive pokemon card game, whoever has the best deck with the best pokemon wins.

    my ultimate solution to this is.

    Gear must be tiered to cater for certain level ranges.

    example: level 20-25 gear is called tier 4 gear

    there are various sets which you can mix and match, no one item of a piece example chest peice is "better" than another chest piece, the stats are instead preferable to a certain play style.

    So lets say Mage A: chest peice gives reduced cool-downs globally by 10% but has less defence rating than mage B with a chest peice which grants increased defence but no enhancement to global cool down

    This is just an example but a thought. Look at league of legends every one at level 30 has the freedom to customize there runes and masteries to how they like to play. One player might max all on Flat increase to damage. Another might add some life steal and armour. Another may have flat cool down reduction. None of thee are automatically superior but are tailor made by the player because it allows them to play at there best, its what suits them.
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