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Running a Large guild with a Small guild mentality.

Discussion in 'Guilds, Circles and Warparties General' started by TheJedi, Apr 6, 2013.

  1. TheJedi

    TheJedi New Cupcake

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    I see thread after thread on various mmo forums were players complain that large guilds are terrible and that players in them feel like a number . They feel like a small peon a tiny cog in the huge machine.

    First off those players have the power in their hands. They always can leave.
    But also It is about the leadership and how they desire their guild to be.

    I will use my current wow guild as an example.

    I have 500 members. I get on I say hello to my guild.. and I get on ts. I set the standard with my officers and the members that if they want to talk to me.. They get on ts. IF they want a private chat I am willing to listen. All my officers are social and helpful and they love seeing more and more players on ts. When we folks need to do content like dailies on the current tier of raiding.. like isle of thunder . we advise folks to group up in sets of 5.. and we hit the island.. its a pvp server.. so we know battles with horde will occur. But by being together.. and being on ts.. if a horde starts messing with a member.. we jump to help. We don't ignore them. we don't mock them because they are having trouble.

    When I started the guild on this new realm I had only 10 members who transferred with me.. And we slowly but surely.. met and talked to new people. We didn't recruit via an addon. WE didn't blindly invite anyone. WE had actual conversations.. Because we don't recruit for 1 tier we recruit for long term.

    It is because of this philosiphy that we have been successful at growing and keeping members.
    The problem with many huge guilds is that the leaders get all these members and then . they have no idea of how to manage those members expectaions. They try to have like.. 4 officers and a gl handling nearly 70 people per person. I think of it more like a class room and a teacher. Keep enough leaders per groups and make sure you as the ultimate person in charge are there to advise and steer the ship the rest of the crew will do well.

    Build a large guild and just look at everyone as easily replaced. ... well you will grow fast first.. but then ultimately like a deck of cards they can easily crumble.

    As long as you keep the standards and principles front and center with the entire guild and you are there to help them all.. And you are organized with events to keep everyone active .. you will do great at keeping the majority happy.

    Try to run a guild like a some evil corporation with an iron fist.. that guild will not last long.
    Success in pvp or pve doesn't excuse any guild leader from the repercussions of being a jerk to anyone. Respect the guild and they will respect you.
    Tiberius and Inukeu like this.
  2. Sick

    Sick Cupcake

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    Maybe I missed it, but this seems to have come out of nowhere. But I agree with what you said. :)

    I don't run as big of a community as 500+ folks, we are only around 60+ active members, but the same holds true for medium sized communities. You have to value your people and make sure everyone in the group has common interest or at least a set of Core Values that tie you together.

    http://exinferno.drupalgardens.com/content/core-values-and-beliefs

    Anyway, I've been absent from WSC for a wee bit and haven't caught where this came from, but I do believe you can have a larger but "small" guild as long as you and your officers and members treat each other with respect.
  3. Tiberius

    Tiberius Cupcake-About-Town

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    In my experience what's amazing about this approach is when the need arises to deal out "guild punishment." In most guilds when someone is pulled aside to get a lecture or whatnot, maybe even guild kicking, the member being reprimanded almost always causes a scene, and can even inadvertently cause a mass exodus. It all follows the "uncaring government power" stereotype.

    Reprimands in a guild with an approachable staff are incredibly different. Someone in trouble typically has a better understanding of what they did bad. Harsh words aren't usually needed by the leaders as everyone is roughly already on the same level of understanding. Reprimands aren't even that, so much as, "Hey, please chill out; Don't do that." Most importantly it brings the entire community together. As a leader, you set the standard of what to expect from your guild and within it. You can still be a stern leader, but with that line of communication open members can have more of an impact, voice, or even just a feeling of responsibility within the group.

    There is a huge difference in being a part of a guild, versus being a member of one.
  4. Merketh

    Merketh Cupcake

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    A while back I saw something that I think is relevant:

    - Publicly comparable endgame success

    - Relatively drama-free cohesion

    - Casual, "family" feel

    Pick two.

    The leap to get all three is not reasonable to expect from any leadership team, nor any guild roster. It's just not worth it, ever.
  5. Sabre070

    Sabre070 Cupcake-About-Town

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    Hint: It should always be the last 2.

    The content isn't going to run away from you, once the hardcores have finished farming it they'll be sitting around waiting for the next content, meanwhile you'll be there doing it happily having a good time.

    I'm not saying don't try to do the best you can do but you certainly shouldn't stop being friends with people just to get more gear.
  6. Tiberius

    Tiberius Cupcake-About-Town

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    WoW has a lot of max member (~1000) social guilds that always try to raid. There's 1 or 2 groups and they typically don't do the greatest, but I think it's great, and important, that they try. It lets people gauge how interested and dedicated they can be, and often is a gateway/stepping stone to dedicated groups. I started that way a few years ago, and soon I accidentally found myself in charge of the raid, and then, an officer of the guild.

    As stated above, it wasn't all about moar loot, it was about community and building a rag team up to become harder-core raiders. Ultimately the group did all join multiple dedicated raiding guilds, but the experience brought us closer together as a community. The fact that it was first ten people bashing their heads against the easiest raid boss and failing frustrated for a few months, later to downing ~80% of the raid is a great feeling. Not competitive, but it was all about just having fun in the first place.
    Sabre070 likes this.
  7. Nymaen

    Nymaen New Cupcake

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    It's not impossible to achieve all 3, but you're not going to get it all perfectly. My guild set up to have values of a "semi-hardcore" player in GW2. To us this meant people who have careers, families or study that comes first and gaming is how they relax, but they enjoy being competitive. Then we put on a layer of focus in our competitive play. We were a force to reckon with and played hard in WvW. Unfortunately, people started getting bored of the game and drifted away. We still have a core family of players who have stuck around the guild for the long haul, despite everything.

    You just have to accept that you need the right player base, guild ideals and a leadership that will uphold those values and you can work towards the end game success. It just can't be all about the end game success, and it can't be expected to last forever without sacrificing the second 2. But I've always been of the stance that a cohesive group of skilled friends who understand each other and communicate well will be most likely to succeed for longer, and you'll get a lot more enjoyment out of your gaming time.

    Everyone just needs to have realistic expectations about what is achievable with the amount of time and effort they are willing to put in. Leadership also has to remember to stick to their guns and not freak out when people leave. Unless of course you're doing something wrong and no one wants to be in your guild any more.
  8. Sabre070

    Sabre070 Cupcake-About-Town

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    Oh, I took "Publicly comparable endgame success" as "within the top 10 kills".

    It's all about the time to get the boss downed the first time, after its been out for a month or two no one cares if you've done it, they just expect that you have.
  9. Nymaen

    Nymaen New Cupcake

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    I'm talking about being in the top kills. Anyone can work towards getting end-game progression done. What I meant was that you may not get the top kills for the first raid instance that comes out, but you could get it for the second one, and if you don't keep your community together, you may not be top kills for the next raid that comes out.

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