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The fathoms of a Guild Leader...

Discussion in 'Guilds, Circles and Warparties General' started by Shu, Apr 16, 2013.

  1. Blankspace

    Blankspace WTB Fun Forum Title

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    That is why you make friends with the awesome people and make sure to play with them often ;)
    Don't feed the trolls.
    Encourage the other positive people around the community.
    Try to be helpful if you are a SME (subject matter expert) or be thoughtful/insightful.

    On the topic at hand?
    Make a guild/organization that fits what you enjoy doing. If you don't enjoy what you are doing you are doing something wrong.
    Build the social aspects of what is important to you.
    Work with people who are timely, good at communicating, and willing to work as hard as you do towards achievable goals.
    Be willing to listen to criticism, feedback, and recognize which is which.

    Some really solid bro advice?
    Don't spam invite. Make your app process be multi-layered so that you bring in quality people.
    Make a project list with those you work with in your guild and manage daily, weekly, and monthly tasks as needed.
    Find some awesome people to do that social media/website building/teamspeak managing, ect ect. People with various skills help keep things running smoothly.

    Mizpah had some really great points also but I didn't want to quote that whole monster!

    Good luck I hope a few random tips/suggestions/musings help!
    iiFrank likes this.
  2. Nymaen

    Nymaen New Cupcake

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    Posting recruitment threads on a forum, giving members text and voice based mediums to chat, encouraging conversation in guild, making events etc.

    My own experience was creating my guild for GW2. I had myself a few friends to start up the guild, and no one had any expectations. I wrote up a guild charter, some information about guild structure etc. Then I made a recruitment ad and found as many forum sites for GW2 out there and put my recruitment ad on each one. I made my ad attractive to look at, informative, and easy to read. I used images for headers to break up the text and make the ad look professional.

    For pre-launch we'd have social gaming in the guild where we'd get together and play something like TF2 or random games that people might enjoy playing together. We'd all hang out in TS, chat on the guild site's chat box, play forum games etc. We even had a guild meet up in real life a few months before the game launched. Giving people things to do that make them feel like a community works.

    Also look at your application system. If you don't have one, make one. Make sure you tune it to look for the right people with the right interests. You want people with personality and interests who you think will contribute. That doesn't mean everyone needs to be outgoing, my community is a full mixture of personalities.

    My advice in dealing with your LoL crew is to make someone incharge of that area, call them some kind of group, and turn yourself in to a gaming community. Start recruiting for your Wildstar section and build up a Wildstar guild. You will have to consider that there may be a social divide between your LoL people and those you recruit for Wildstar though.
  3. iiFrank

    iiFrank Cupcake-About-Town

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    That's why I plan to make a committed Circle of Settlers outside of my guild activity or part of to make the best experience for my server possible as far as town-upgrades/taxi-points/higher-tire constructs things of that nature. I think it will be a great impact for the game to have these kinds of circles to help push the path system further than what already has been introduced to us :cool:

    Quick Edit: When i spoke of members i meant of the WSC community not my current guild which i'm not sure where i stand as far as a guild right now, until release ofc.
  4. Blankspace

    Blankspace WTB Fun Forum Title

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    Not that I can talk about it publicly too much but we are planning on having a few circles/groups/campfires with our new friends here at WSC and the amazing community we are a part of here at Wildstar ;)
  5. SituationSoap

    SituationSoap Cupcake-About-Town

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    OP, I hate to be this guy because I know you've put a lot of work into your guild website, but here's the skinny: the picture is pretty good, it provides a nice background. The design is...not.

    Green and black are not colors that should ever be used as the primary theme for a website. Ever. There's way too much color on your page (you can drop basically all of the piping around your elements and you'd lose nothing), the font is far too small, and you're trying to cram far too much onto the front page.

    Your guild website is a marketing section. You're trying to tell new members why they should apply for your guild. Many guilds do this with a basic blog that lists recent accomplishments. Some do it with a quick blurb about the guild. Hide your calendar away from the first page. Don't put your activity on the first page. Put your accomplishments -- the things that are going to make you attractive to new members. The existing members are going to be able to click through to wherever they need to go; your job is making sure that new potential members don't need to.

    Managing a guild is about growing; you need to constantly be bringing in new members to replace those who've left. If your website is actively working against you in that fashion, you're hurting your chances.

    I know that this isn't the softest way to put this, but it looks like you're working hard and I think you've got a good chance at success. I just want to make sure that you're not harming yourself with your website.
  6. Shu

    Shu Cupcake

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    Regardless of your opinion, we won't be changing the site - all of our members love the site, the background, and everything on it. They like using the shoutbox and seeing the events on the front page so they don't have to go through 3-5 clicks just to see when the meeting is. The font is your typical 12px Arial, nothing new or different from 90% of other sites.

    I think your advice is more of your opinion rather than trying to help me out...
  7. SituationSoap

    SituationSoap Cupcake-About-Town

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    That's rather the point. You've created a website that's designed to cater to members you already have, not generate new ones. In a thread where you're actively looking for recommendations on how to improve your recruiting tactics, I would expect that you're actively seeking criticism about the way that you're doing things now.

    Since that doesn't seem to be the case, I'll bid you good luck and good hunting.
  8. AIMonster

    AIMonster New Cupcake

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    Hello, I thought I'd throw out some insight because while I'm not our Community Manager who runs the community itself I've been a part of a successful multi-game community with something along the lines of 200 active members and am currently the guild leader of our Wildstar chapter.

    I've seen a lot of what works and doesn't with multi-game communities. IGC has made a few missteps along the way, but we've learned from it and continue to grow because of it. Here are some suggestions for you, WARNING it will be long:

    - Don't disband any chapters you have active members and leadership in. It's possible you may never see LoL players migrate over to other games in the community, but this shouldn't be viewed as a problem. They should always have the option of being able to pick up a new game and play it with the community if they decide to or eventually become bored with LoL. There will be members who stick with one game, there will be members who consistently switch games with the community, and there will be members who join your community for a new game and then decide they want to migrate over to another game your community is playing. Embrace all these types of members.
    - Setup some basic leadership and structure for each game, but let each game's leadership run itself. For example in IGC we have a basic premise that we are a semi-hardcore guild and usually focus on progression, but how we go about doing that and what "progression" means depends on the what the guild's leadership decides the direction they want to take that particular guild in.
    - Don't get upset if there is no interest in a particular game. We sent out feelers and even started up a few chapters in IGC that haven't been successful, but we've found instances where no one wants to hold leadership responsibility in that chapter and there was just a general lack of interest in the community. If you absolutely want to bring a community in game take over leadership of it for a while till you can bring in someone you are confident enough to be a leader.
    - Don't try to wear too many hats. This goes back to setting up leadership and structure. Make sure that not only do you have leadership structure in a particular game, but you have people managing other administrative duties within the community itself. When you get to have a lot of members it's going to be especially problematic because just about everyone is going to come to you with their problems and it's important to split your workload so you don't become overwhelmed.
    - Don't try to recruit people specifically looking for a community, instead recruit by game. Don't be picky. Once people are part of the community they'll likely see the advantage of it. Some will stick around, some will not. (Note: Not saying don't advertise your community as a whole and some people will want to join solely for the community concept, but the majority of people you get will be from personal guild / clan / etc. recruitment in game)
    - People will just leave with no word. Hopefully you can leave enough of an impression on people. In my experience about half of new recruits for a new game especially when recruiting this early, whether you are part of a community or not, (I've been in several guilds before I was ever in IGC) will leave before launch or within the first month with no reason stated. It's the nature of new games. Some people don't enjoy it. It's your job (or another leader's) to make sure people stay active and keep interest in the game. If you don't see any activity from a person within a certain amount of time try to contact them through their e-mail or Steam or anything more personal and ask them what's up. You often won't get a response, but there is always a chance you could convince someone to come back or stick around in the community for a new game.
    Bulk likes this.
  9. Shu

    Shu Cupcake

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    I have no problem with criticism, but saying to "never use black and green" on a website is a bit of a silly remark.. those are our clan colors.

    WOW. Thank you for those pointers, I respect IG, they are a very awesome community. :) I've also had a lot of problems with people leaving for no reason and your little tips seem like a move in the right direction.

    Thanks bud.
  10. Bulk

    Bulk New Cupcake

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    I haven't lead a guild in a couple of years but when I did, it sucked up most of my free time. My head hurts just thinking about leading multiple guilds. As the leader of the community, I see your job as making sure your sub groups have effective leadership, more than actually leading them yourself. Put yourself in a position where you can focus on leading the guild for the game you really want to play.

    When you are able to focus on building your guild, decide what you want to be and recruit specifically for that. It might sound basic, but alot of guilds fail because they never really decide what they want to be. You just want to have a cool laid back atmosphere for leveling alts? Cool,recruit for that. Want to raid every third Sunday from 5-7pm PST. Cool, recruit for that. Want to compete for world firsts? Recruit for that!

    I highly suggest a focused recruitment strategy for building a long term guild. Other tactics can and will fill your roster faster, but with who? What good does it do to have your membership all over the map in terms of activity, playstyle etc.?

    If you are building a raid guild, figure out your raid schedule asap. Then, raid on those days no matter what. Coop with other guilds, pug, whatever it takes. You have to show your members that sticking with the guild over the long haul will pay off. At the very least, you will cultivate a consistent raid roster, over time.

    As far as websites go, I like a slick site and all, but I've never joined a guild for one. If I fit in with the playerbase and the guild is active when I can play, I'm interested. A basic site is fine as long as it functions and states what you are about effectuvely.

    Best of luck to the OP
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