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What's your opinion on gaming communities?

Discussion in 'Guilds, Circles and Warparties General' started by SamuraiKav, Jul 9, 2013.

  1. SamuraiKav

    SamuraiKav New Cupcake

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    Howdy! I have some questions for you concerning large guilds!

    I was curious about the larger cross game communities and people's thoughts on them. As a member of AIE, I understand that some people do not like the larger gaming communities and some do. I don't speak for AIE, or any of the other communities, but I would like to hear people's opinions. Personally, I like having a home in about any game I decide to play or try.

    MOG Nation - Like many gaming communities, it was formed to transcend the confines of a single game. Members had a common banner to play under no matter the game, and runs "chapters". A chapter is basically an expedition force into a game that may or may not become official for that game. They also have affiliate guilds that were previously formed guilds that have asked to join or been recruited under the MOG Nation umbrella. All affiliate guilds run themselves with their own leadership.

    Enigma is an EU community formed in 2005 in WoW and moved out to other games from there. It's a great example that time restrictions away from the keyboard aren't a bad thing and even the most casual can strive to greatness to bring honor and glory to the banner! As a well structured machine, the members conquer, and judging by the age restriction of 21 (some exceptions), may have some brew while doing so. They are a community that looks for personality as much as the character you play.

    Team Legacy is an offshoot from Team Liquid and works to be the best. Run by seperate councils for seperate needs, the TL crew runs it's ship based on research, strategy, tactics, and more. It strives to be the top of the class in all that it can. Council members are elected to avoid favoratism, a ticket system allows for any and all to give their voice without getting lost in the clutter than can come with large numbers. When you carry the banner of Team Legacy, those around you know that you have planned every outcome in advance and the outcome is the one you choose.

    AIE has just shy of 7,000 members in WoW alone, and anybody is welcome. When Blizz put a member cap on the guilds, we created subguilds and use an addon to talk between them. There are some PG rules that keep it kid friendly, but otherwise the leaders lead from the background. The AIE community has presences in many of the other MMOs, non-MMOs, as well as a large Steam group. Members create events, raid teams, PVP teams, etc. AIE is about family in game and out.

    What is your opinion on large guilds/gaming communities?

    Would you enjoy participating in a large guild or community?

    If you're not a member of these communities, would you participate in public game events they sponsor?

    What do you feel the impact of these large communities is on a server, and the game as a whole?

    What feedback would you offer any of these communities?

    If the devs happen to notice this, is there anything we can do for you to make your lives easier? Anything you'd like us to do in Wildstar? While I don't speak for these communities, if there is anything we can do to make your lives easier from our persepctive, let us know!

    My apologies if I missed any of the other communities, but those listed above are the ones I know of, please add your name, or PM me and I'll add it. =)
  2. Teehk

    Teehk Cupcake-About-Town

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    I love them :) Team Legacy :inlove:
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  3. Outlaw

    Outlaw Cupcake-About-Town

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    Just on break now, but this is a topic that's become pretty important to me so I'll give a more in depth answer when I'm at an actual computer, but for now I'll just say Multi-Gaming Communities(MGCs) are great and I encourage everyone (even those who don't like large guilds) to at least try a MGC out.
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  4. Kasern

    Kasern Cupcake

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    I am against any online gaming group with more than 50 odd members. I much prefer a smaller, tight-knit guild of people with similar personalities and similar goals that stick together from game to game.

    Large communities (and this just my opinion) tend to have a lot of dead weight in them and are a pain to lead properly. In previous guilds I've belonged to they were often dismissed as zerg guilds or casualfests and rarely have a seen proof otherwise.

    Of course, that works for some people so it's nice that we can have all times of organisations.

    -EDIT-
    I don't consider Alliances to be gaming communities.
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  5. SamuraiKav

    SamuraiKav New Cupcake

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    I agree, Kasern. It's hard to see some large guilds as anything but these things. While some of them boast being elite and not living up to that name, what do you think of those that don't? AIE, my largest and longest experience, just boasts a family friendly community. As an example, it doesn't boast to be the best, but there are WoW raid groups that are heroic raid groups, and the same in others.

    Do you see all these large communites this way, or just large guilds in general? The size matters to you, but other than that, is there a reason you don't like casualfest guilds?
  6. Voison

    Voison Moderator • Foxy Cupcake

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    I don't want to sound biased, being a member of Team Legacy and all... But I think we run a semi-larger community the right way. We're more casualcore then anything. Yes we aim to be the top and win, but we focus on having fun and being a community too. I say casual because we're actually pretty laid back. Yes we have weekly meetings and require people to show up, but we have absence documents people can sign. We understand people will have social lives, wifes/husbands, kids, work, and just whatever else life throws at us from time to time. We have some members who are in the military, so they may be gone a few weeks at a time. We have some members who are on call 24/7 it seems like :p, and might have to leave without much warning. We don't remove anyone just because of things they can't control in real life.
    Now when I say core, I'm referring to being a hardcore community. Don't let this word scare you. In a way we are very similar to other hardcore guilds/communities. We aim for the top in any game we play. We spend months planning and learning different things, before a game even comes out. We love to theorycraft! :inlove: We have literally dozens of documents dedicated towards PvP, PvE, Economy, Crafting, and so much more just for Wildstar. Seem like a bit much? To some it might be and this is why we interview people, before we allow them to join our community. Its not just so we can make sure they're a good fit for TL. But make sure TL is a good fit for them as well.
    When it comes to recruiting, we don't mass recruit or like having a group larger than 200. Again this isn't for everyone, but we seem to have no issues running our community with this amount of people. We have no issues keeping track of people or people "slipping through". If someone does slip through or doesn't want to support our community, we handle it with simply asking if theres anything we can improve on. We try to have multiple games / events going on till Wildstar, so everyone can find a game to play with each other. Like right now we have around 12 people playing TERA, a few playing rift, a dozen playing cube world, we have a DnD group, we have plenty of people playing LoL, and so much more. We try to make sure no one feels left out or just a number. :up:
    Like you said above, our leaders are not hand picked by one person. We either "vote" them in by the community or allow anyone to step up and volunteer. We want everyone to have a shot at leading a raid or a battleground, but at the sametime don't want just one person being in charge. This is a great way to avoid drama (Which we have a strict rule against). Right now I think the ticket system is being worked on, due to some upgrades to our forums. We do have a giant skype chat (A few actually), so if anyone needs someone then are just a skype chat away. Our leaders are clearly marked in TS and on the forums, and have it so someone should be on most times of the day & night. We make it clear with our members, that if you have questions, concerns, or just an idea, our leaders will be all ears and willing to help with whatever is needed. :) We strive for people to feel "at home" and I'm sure a good amount of our members will agree with me, when I say we do a good job of it.

    We're not elitist but yet we strive to be a great community for people. We may aim for the top, but we don't always reach it. In guild wars 2, we had a lot of fun in WvW and sPvP. I don't think we we're the best guild in WvW, but we're still one of the most talked guilds around. Not because we we're the best or people had a major issue with us. Its because how much effort we put into WvW and how well planned we were. We have a ton of videos on youtube, from our GW2 days. People still watch them and apply to TL just because of our videos. They got to see how much work we put into winning, while laughing and having a good time with everyone.

    Its 8 AM and I just got off work... I should stop at some point. :p



    TL;DL: We like to stick around 200 members, but try our best to keep everyone entertained and feel like a member, not a number. We're casualcore players. We aim for the top while understanding people have lives outside of the game. We don't mass recruit and think both winning and community are important.

    Edit: These are some of the reasons I've been with TL for over a year now. Even before GW2 open weekend beta started. :p I LOVE the community we have. :inlove:
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  7. Aku

    Aku New Cupcake

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    I am personally not a fan of big communities due to the fact of liking small tight-knit groups. Now being part of Team Legacy has given me an opportunity to be in the large guild but also facilitates small gaming groups or communities within the community. So while I may hang out/play games with a small function of 5-10 people, we are still under the umbrella of TL which im perfectly fine with.

    Back in my WoW days, I ran a couple of small 10 man guilds and because of the this, I grew to love the relationships between few people as opposed to many. As the guild got bigger, guild dynamics and politics began to change and unfortunately outside of my control. Based on this, I've always been under the belief that small is better and more efficient. But when a larger guild is done properly, yet still allows those to hang out in smaller teams, I believe something great will come out of it.
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  8. Kasern

    Kasern Cupcake

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    Like I said, it's great that there are different size guilds and different type of guilds for everyone. I've had a few experiences with large gaming communities in the past and was a member of Tactical Gaming, AUCrew and The Older Gamers under various names over the years and even when in officer positions with those groups I never felt like more than just another name.

    As to raid teams and pvp teams within those kinds of communities, in my experience again, those tend to lead towards cliques and factions forming within the organisation more often then not and in cases I've witnessed lead to these factions exodusing from the community to form their own guild.

    I get the appeal though. Lots of people at all hours of the day or night, always someone to play with or something going on. That's great. That's the reason I've joined them in the past, but I have always enjoyed my time more when part of a tighter, more serious guild.
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  9. Legendox

    Legendox New Cupcake

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    Lots of people are discouraged when it comes to interacting with a large group of people. Especially during the introductory period of joining that new community of gamers. The nice thing about gaming communities, is that most are built to support those new people. If you are looking to join a group of individuals that game together, then most likely you will find people with the same type of interests and aversions as you have.
    I am a part of Team Legacy. What this means to me, is logging on to a Team Speak server and seeing 60+ people on at any given time playing a variety of games. I just join a channel and all of a sudden I am a part of their game. Doesn't seem to matter who is in the channel. This is a group of people who place real life before gaming events. Volunteers step up to take on the roles that are more demanding of time and resources. Nothing is forced on anyone. Its just about the love of gaming and enjoying the success of accomplishing things.

    TL;DR - Gaming communities are amazing places full of awesome people, but I might be biased because I am in a good one.
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  10. Space-Coyote

    Space-Coyote New Cupcake

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    Today's community in WoW is the f*n worst. Of course I don't have any other communities to compare it to, but I'm pretty sure it's bad on any standards. LF-whatever tools and shared Battlegrounds have certainly made things more lively and in most cases, smooth, but before any of those things, you had a reputation to keep clean on your own realm, at least if you wanted to group up with helpful and skilled people. Today? Well it isn't likely that you'll ever see those cross-realm jerks you're grouped up with again, so you might as well call them names and act like a douchebag in general, if things won't go exactly your way or if they aren't "geared" properly or aren't as "skilled" as you are...and by god, if you take more than five minutes to kill that boss, thus making the dungeon duration 15 minutes long as a whole, when it should've been 10 minutes, then BY GOD, YOU'RE THE WORST PERSON ON EARTH!!1

    ...so yeah, the community in WoW sucks way more when compared to the olde days™ (and this isn't looking at it through rose-tinted glasses) but luckily there's still some helpful people around, even if they're vastly outnumbered by the opposite people.
  11. SamuraiKav

    SamuraiKav New Cupcake

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    AIE is small groups, but merely because you, the member, form raid groups and create events and tend to find others like you. There are a few guild run events, like the craft Faire. It's run by volunteers in WoW where volunteers give mats, then we spend a Sat and Sun helping people level professions. Usually 20 per profession is budgeted. We use spreadsheets and such to keep track. As a former captain in charge of a profession, it was a lot of fun. I've since taken a break and can't commit the time, but will still help.

    Raid teams are created by members as well. Officers may or may not be in these raid teams but while in them, they don't usually pull rank and let the raid leader do their thing. While the guild chat is kept under check to avoid heated problems and child friendly banter, usually raid teams and groups have their own channel and the guild vent has a rule that in a private raid/group channel, it's at your own risk.

    I am biased, I love my guild. I understand the tight, smaller groups mentality and why people like them. As Aku said, smaller groups within the larger guild are fine and in AIE, raid teams tend to share players if needed for different raids and events. I personally was a heroic raider and AIE doesn't have many, but there are a few.

    Thanks for the constructive input so far, keep it coming!
  12. eselle8

    eselle8 Well-Known Cupcake

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    I'm not a big guild person myself. I'm primarily interested in personal interaction in a guild, which requires a small enough membership for me to get to know people well. I'm in a fairly small multi-game community, which has its own challenges as it means sometimes we have to choose between following the herd to the game people feel like playing or staying in an old favorite without groupmates, but it's the closest things that I've found to a good solution.

    As for large, multi-game communities, I judge guilds more by their presence and behavior in a particular game than by their size or organizational structure. If I see hundreds of players with a guild tag, many of those players are among those who grief or annoy others, and especially if the guild tends to spam chat or send unsolicited whispers to players, I'll assume it's a zerg guild and will be skeptical of players with its tag. If I frequently see a guild's tag, but it doesn't recruit in ways that irritate other players and I never or only rarely have problems with its members, I'll assume it's a simply a large guild and will assume it's a productive force on the server.

    As for whether they're elite or casualfests...I'll confess that beyond being able to recognize the server first type guilds, I don't really care if someone else's guild is elite or casual or somewhere in between. There's nothing wrong with being a casual player, and I've been playing long enough to understand that sometimes relatively serious, skilled players will choose casual guilds and that seeing a casual-oriented tag on the PUG's healer doesn't necessarily mean anything.
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  13. rylax

    rylax New Cupcake

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    A lot of you seem to be making a de facto correlation between larger gaming communities and a feeling of not being just another "name in the bucket". That's not capable of being stated with absolution. Before joining TL my vote may have swayed a different direction. I'm not attempting to shamelessly plug Team Legacy, but prior to them I don't have any experience with larger gaming communities. They are a prime example of why a larger game community, just like a smaller community, cannot be judged simply by size.

    We had a lot of people who were able to show up for our meeting last week. Admittedly, I do not know all of them. A lot of them are new. I do, however, know who the majority of them are. Some of them I see and talk to on our TL forums, some in TL skype, and still others in our TS. We're all friendly and we want every member to join in and be part of our conversations. We encourage people, especially those who are normally timid backgrounders, to engage in activities and discussions with the whole group.

    I could drop into a TS game channel where I see 3 or 4 people playing a game that I've never played before, and I guarantee it'll take less than 10 seconds for everyone to say Hi and invite me to play with them. That's pretty awesome personal interaction if you ask me.

    I could see people getting "lost" in larger gaming communities in general, but that seems like an effect with multiple causes.

    1. Leadership
    2. Membership
    2. Personal Choice

    You need good leadership, you need to want to be interactive with more people, and you need other members who want the same thing. Being introverted doesn't disqualify you. You can learn to be more outgoing if you want to be part of a bigger gaming organization. If you join a larger group, and choose to sit on the sidelines never engaging in anything.. or maybe talking to only one or two people.. then you are absolutely going to feel like just another rock in the river.

    I am not trying to put any negative connotation on smaller groups, because I spent most of my game life in them. They can be a ton of fun... especially when you meet up irl and have a few beers :). But I could do that with TL too. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time with them thus far, and I do not find Team Legacy or its members to be lacking. We're most definitely a tight-knit family community... just a big tight-knit family community, lol.
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  14. SamuraiKav

    SamuraiKav New Cupcake

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    I can see this. Anybody that listens to WoW podcasts may listen to Convert to Raid. This is a group of guys that started in AIE and now run the CtR guild Alliance side. Otherwise, I know of raid groups that split off from AIE to form their own raiding guilds because of the gold it brought in and guild bank access. Things like this are better for a smaller guild. I have run LFG or LFR and been randomly put in with a guildie I had never met. IMO, that isn't a bad thing, but usually because I end up getting to know them.
  15. Kasern

    Kasern Cupcake

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    I like to think of belonging to a guild as the same as belonging to a local football team. You show up for practice nights two or three nights a week, you have a big game once a week, maybe two games and some weekends you go out for beers together or have a BBQ. The success of that team is your success. You wear the colours and you have fun. You get to know the guys on your team, you learn their strengths and weaknesses and you work as a whole to better each other.

    IMO, big multi-game communities are more like Little Athletics Clubs. Bunch of kids all running around doing different activies, sometimes playing together, sometimes against one another. You all have fun and the club's success is based on its membership numbers, the money it brings in and how much fun people are having rather than how many medals or games they win. I'm sure I could go somewhere with this about how the only people who really prosper from these things are the coaches, or in gaming terms, the leaders. But I don't really believe that about gaming communities, for the most part they really are what they claim to be.
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  16. Ico

    Ico Moderator • WSC's Gentle Flower

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    Personally, I prefer single game orientated communities. By that I mean a community that will move from one game to another (or just stick with one), members still play other games together and the such, but all the "community" effort goes into one game, tends to let you get the most out of that one game :)
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  17. Isil

    Isil Cupcake

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    Being Part of and Community Officer in Heresy Gaming, I love the Community part of gaming and it does not have to mean that you can't perform in any of the games you are in, We are currently one of the best EU Imperial guilds in SWTOR and we are in the Top 10 worldwide in Rift, We used to be a top EU guild in Aion and in Warhammer as well.

    Communities to me mean that you can grow outside just a single group of people, we currently are at around 150 in ours, but its all good people who has come in and been tried through our games, we don't just take in everybody, we take in people that fit who we are and what we do. That more than anything makes it a good atmosphere to be in.
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  18. SamuraiKav

    SamuraiKav New Cupcake

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    While AIE has presences in other games, it really is much more WoW based. We are kind of the opposite of Heresy. Anybody that meets the rules and wants in, gets in. This is all based off a member standpoint. Officer may have a different view of everything. I appreciate all the responses to this topic. I'm hoping to get some more responses so that we, as gaming communities, can continue to adapt. =)
  19. Outlaw

    Outlaw Cupcake-About-Town

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    Well, I've been a part of large guilds and small guilds and I honestly like them both. Personally, I've never felt a feeling of exclusion in any guild I've played with, large or small, but I think things like that mainly stem from people being less outgoing or less skilled in the game anyway. If you're outgoing and good at the game you'll be known by people even in a large guild and you can wheedle your way into the cliques that are most damaging in small guilds. After trying both though, I can honestly say I much prefer a MGC to either.

    I usually wait until I've hit max level, gotten a bit geared, and have a pretty full friend's list before I look for a guild to join, and one thing I disliked about both types was that if I ever felt like playing a different game (from boredom or from curiosity) I would leave behind the friends I'd made or splinter larger guilds when some people decided to try something different or leave shells of a guild in smaller ones. It usually created a profound sense of loss that would sometimes have me running back to a game I had grown to loathe.

    To me a MGC is a combination of all the best parts of both types of guilds. It's a large group of close-knit relationships formed through the trials of multiple games, and because community is the core of a MGC being able to play with and learn who's who is much easier when you play with the same community across multiple games. In the past, each new game was usually a fresh start for me, and while those can be nice sometimes, it's even better to have friends to share your journeys with. As a member of Team Legacy any game I join in there's a place for me with a bunch of familiar people from the moment I create my character and it's a pretty spectacular feeling.
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  20. Convicted

    Convicted Super Cupcake

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    I skimmed over things, as I do have a little bit of knowledge of AIE, and I didn't see this mentioned but isn't that guild ( AIE ) on an RP server in Wow?
    I have seen large mega-type guilds on normal servers, but those guilds were in the several hundred range, so I don't know if an RP server would have an easier time forming a guild like AIE, just a thought.
    I personally prefer to have as small a guild as is practical for a 40man raid group so something in the 50-60 range area, and didn't really see an overwhelming impact from the mega guild on the normal server I played on.
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